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Lil Boosie Calls Out ‘Gimmick’ Artists For Only Rapping About Money And Not The Struggle



Lil Boosie is not happy with the state of Hip Hop. The Baton Rouge rapper finds the genre is becoming too materialistic and losing its authenticity.

Boosie expressed his thoughts on the matter in an episode of Nightcap With Peter Bailey web series.

“Today, it seems like don’t nobody struggle, don’t know rapper struggle,” he said. “Like everybody riding, shining, bottles… and a lot of stuff rappers talking, they not living. Really, you a gimmick. Really, you putting on a front for your fans. That separates me from a lot of artists because my music is more heartfelt than anything.







The misdirection of Hip Hop has long been a topic of discussion. The forefathers and torchbearers of the genre have provided their critiques of the genre and how it can survive.

Scarface said he feels like black culture is “losing” Hip Hop.

“I feel like the people that’s in control of what Hip Hop does is so f------ white and so f------ Jewish until they don’t give a f--- about what the culture and craft really is about,” he said.

The “My Block” rapper said the present industry is brainwashing African-Americans to look “stupid” and “dumb.”



Legendary producer Mannie Fresh also had some choice words about the current state of Hip-Hop. Fresh, who is responsible for a slew of hits in the late 90s and 2000s, is upset there is no “growth” in the genre.

“Southern music is stuck to me, it’s one way,” he said in an interview with Soul Culture. “It’s 808s, snare rolls and hi-hats. I love that all these cats grew up on Mannie Fresh sound, but I’m looking for a little bit of growth. I think we’ve been in that same spot long enough. It’s time to move on.”

The one-time Big Tymer, born Byron Thomas, said rappers are sounding like rappers from different regions.

You got New York rappers, he said, that sound like they from the South.

“I’m not saying nothing is wrong with that, but what happened to the East Coast sound, what happened to the West Coast sound,” he said.

Fresh pointed out when he was coming up, Hip-Hop provided different genres within a genre.

“At one point rap had Public Enemy. Public Enemy was our pro-black,” he said. “We had Slick Rick. Slick Rick was our storyteller. We had NWA. NWA was our gangster rap. You had CashMoney. That was your Bling Bling. That’s four different genres of rap. We don’t have that right now.”

Now, he said, it’s based on the club.

Hip-Hop, he continued, growing up to me was a teacher as well.

“It was a culture and a teacher,” he said. “You had the choice of saying today I want to hear something positive. Today, I want to hear something that’s all about the hood. We just don’t have that right now. It’s out there, but the labels are not pushing that. The labels are going mainstream. We want you to look like this and sound like this. We’re not going to take a chance on that artist that’s heartfelt. You gotta go underground to find that.”



LL Cool J believes artists can stay close to the core of Hip Hop by being original.

The rapper, born James Todd Smith, wrote on his Twitter account that it is very important for the Hip Hop culture to be expanded.

But he said in order for that to be accomplished, artists must stop “chasing trends.”

“I feel it’s imperative that Hiphop Artists expand hip hop culture. You can’t do that by chasing trends. You have to be bold. You gotta do you,” he wrote.



Kendrick Lamar co-signs the argument Hip Hop should be original. But what he didn’t like was the promotion of Molly in Hip Hop culture.

According to drugfree.org, “Molly, short for molecule, is considered to be pure MDMA, unlike Ecstasy, which generally is laced with other ingredients, such as caffeine or methamphetamine.”

Kendrick expressed his thoughts on Molly during an interview with MTV News correspondent Sway.

“I like trends. In high school, we had the button ups. Jay-Z did that. Cool trend. The jerseys. Cool Trend. Air Forces and then sometimes you have the trends thats not that cool. You may have certain artists portraying these trends and don’t really have that lifestyle and then it gives off the wrong theme and it becomes kind of corny after awhile. It’s really about keeping Hip Hop original and pushing away the corniness.”

~Kendrick Lamar, MTV News

Watch Kendrick Lamar’s full interview with Sway below:

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Kendrick addressed topic of Molly in his music video for single “B-tch, Don’t Kill My Vibe.”



Danny Brown, on the other hand, loves the drug and slammed Kendrick Lamar’s “Death To Molly” movement.

“…Molly is to party—you’re having fun,” Brown told Complex Magazine. “You’re not even thinking about none of your problems. I hate when I see a video on WorldStar of some dude running in the street naked and they’re talking about he’s on molly. Even the Kendrick ‘Death to Molly’ thing, it’s just like, Why? I’m not about to be no drug junkie for molly. I’m tired of defending it at this point. We’re having fun. We’re having a good time. Why are you so mad? I’m not a molly rapper. Molly is just my alter ego; it brings out the person that wants to have fun.”

Despite being a fan of Molly, Brown revealed in a Reddit thread that he nearly overdosed on the drug.

One user on Reddit asked the “Molly Ringwald” rapper to describe the craziest experience he has had with a drug.

Brown replied, “damn near overdosed on mdma in london .. but i played one of my best shows that night.”



Molly has now become a staple in today’s rap songs, having been endorsed by rappers Juicy J, Trinidad James, Chief Keef, Kanye West, 2 Chainz and French Montana.

NBC Philadelphia reports Molly has been getting increased attention a two people succumbed from the drug after attending Electric Zoo festival in New York City.

Brown recalled he was first introduced to Molly during a rave party in Detroit, MI during an interview with Complex Magazine.

“In Detroit we have some of the illest rave scenes,” he explained. “The first time I ever saw molly, it was when ecstasy started to fade out. It was something new. There was this one guy, a drug dealer, a white boy. We called him Stacks. He had these big-a-- bags of powder. He would just feed it to the party. He’d be walking around the party with the bag and his credit card and was just giving everybody molly. You would see girls walking up like birds.

“…Molly is to party—you’re having fun,” he continued. “You’re not even thinking about none of your problems. I hate when I see a video on WorldStar of some dude running in the street naked and they’re talking about he’s on molly. Even the Kendrick ‘Death to Molly’ thing, it’s just like, Why? I’m not about to be no drug junkie for molly. I’m tired of defending it at this point. We’re having fun. We’re having a good time. Why are you so mad? I’m not a molly rapper. Molly is just my alter ego; it brings out the person that wants to have fun.”

Wiz Khalifa, too, supports Molly records.

He revealed in an interview with Hard Knock TV he does “Molly” records because of its popularity. The Pittsburgh native said he would be crazy not to cash in on it.



“I did a joint with Tyga, too. The molly record, that just came out.

“I think it’s past the people who are actually using it. It’s just money now,” the “Black and Yellow” rapper said. “You know what I mean? And I would be crazy not to tap into that. Like I want some of that money, too.

Wiz said it’s not his place to stop children from using the drug.

“And its kids, they are partying and having fun, so I’m not going to tell you what not to do,” he said. “You know what I’m saying. I’ve never been that dude. Like when I seen it was kind of growing and becoming more and more popular, at first I was one of the people that was ‘Yall need to chill with the Molly.’ I said that. But the more popular it grew, it got bigger than me and my influence, so it’s like you can either get with it or get lost. So I do not want to get lost.”

Though Wiz hops on “Molly” tracks, he said he never raps about popping the drug.

“I just brought the Mary aspect to it,” he said. “I never talk about popping Molly. But I’ll say some slang that you know people who do molly, they f*ck with it and I’ll say what I do do.”

Wiz mused on the possibility of the “Molly” fad dying out by the end of the year, but said he would continue to do records about the drug until it does.

“I just did another Molly song with Lil’ Durk,” he said. “The ‘Molly Girl’ record and it’s really, really tight and it’s about Molly and I think people are going to love it. Like they’re not going to get tired of it, not yet. It’s the beginning of the year. Maybe in December, they’ll be tire of it.”

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